Ceo pay backdating

If the company sets the prices of the options grant well below the market price, they will instantaneously generate an expense, which counts against income.

The backdating concern occurs when the company does not disclose the facts behind the dating of the option.

Under the Board’s policy of providing for annual votes, the next say-on-pay vote will occur at our 2018 annual meeting. These advisory proposals are not binding on the Board.

However, the Board and the Compensation Committee will review and consider the voting results when evaluating our executive compensation program.

Options backdating is the practice of altering the date a stock option was granted, to a usually earlier (but sometimes later) date at which the underlying stock price was lower.

This is a way of repricing options to make them valuable or more valuable when the option "strike price" (the fixed price at which the owner of the option can purchase stock) is fixed to the stock price at the date the option was granted.

The number of shares subject to option was 250,000 and the exercise price was (the trough in the stock price graph below.) Given a year-end price of , the intrinsic value of the options at the end of the year was (-) x 250,000 = ,750,000.

In order to lock in a profit on day one of an options grant, some executives simply backdate (set the date to an earlier time than the actual grant date) the exercise price of the options to a date when the stock was trading at a lower level. In this article, we'll explore what options backdating is and what it means for companies and their investors. Most businesses or executives avoid options backdating; executives who receive stock options as part of their compensation, are given an exercise price that is equivalent to the closing stock price on the date the options grant is issued.

This means they must wait for the stock to appreciate before making any money.

Backdating allows executives to choose a past date when the market price was particularly low, thereby inflating the value of the options.

An example illustrates the potential benefit of backdating to the recipient.